Local business threads have an interesting connection with the Royal Court


Parkersburg, W.Va. (WTAP) –

As the Queen takes Monday off, some royal connections to the central Ohio Valley have been dug up.

Krennic Manufacturing is a locally owned business that creates threads and needles for needleworkers, crafters, fly fishermen and more.

As Elizabeth II attends her funeral on Monday, more than 70 years after she became Queen of England, the owner of Krink said the business helped him by sewing something fun. The relationship between the queen, the royal family and the central Ohio Valley.

Doug Krynick says the company came together after the fire at Windsor Castle in 1992. Hampton Court or Windsor Castle claims to have met them for their metalwork.

The company makes synthetic threads that look like real gold. It was this thread that the court wanted to make.

They said that the company was known all over the world and that they were the only ones making that kind of yarn at that time.

Krink Manufacturing  In 1992, he presented synthetic gold fibers to the royal court.
Krink Manufacturing In 1992, he presented synthetic gold fibers to the royal court.(Alexa Griffey)

“So I’m thinking these cans were used in Buckingham Palace to keep people from stealing them. Or they were used as cones throughout Windsor Castle. But the queen would fix everything.

Although he doesn’t remember much about the 1992 interaction, he does remember the visit.

“We did… we went to Hampton Court to see him and my sister and I do the sewing. It was amazing. It would be after we sent them things.

The company has many other interesting connections with other groups, shows and films, including Game of Thrones, the Abraham Lincoln Museum, Paris and the Swedish Opera House, and Hocus Pocus Two.

The owner explains the threads used in episodes of Game Of Thrones.
The owner explains the threads used in episodes of Game Of Thrones.(Alexa Griffey)

You could say this local business has made history in more ways than one.



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